Pothos

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Pothos, Money plant or botanical name Epipremnum aureum is arguably the easiest of all houseplants to grow, even if you are a person who forgets to water your plants. This trailing vine has pointed, heart-shaped green leaves, sometimes variegated with white, yellow, or pale green. While pothos likes bright, indirect light it can thrive in areas that don’t get a lot of sunlight or have only fluorescent lighting. It's an excellent plant for locations such as offices and dorm rooms.

 

 

Air Purifying Houseplant

According to the clean air study by NASA, Pothos plant removes pollutants such as benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide and xylene from the air. The harmful effect of these pollutants can’t be underestimated.

Soil

Pothos plants don’t actually have to be planted in soil; they do very well just placed in a container with water. If you do decide to plant them in soil, any potting mix is fine. Be aware that a plant that’s gotten used to being in just water may not do too well if transferred to soil. 

Light

Outdoors, pothos can be grown in shade to partial shade. Indoors, pothos prefers bright but indirect light. Variegated plants sometimes lose their leaf pattern and revert to all-green plants if they don't get enough light; moving them to brighter conditions usually restores the variegation. Suddenly paler-looking leaves mean the  plant is getting too much sun.

Water

Pothos like to have their soil dry out completely between waterings. If left continually in damp soil, the roots will rot. Black spots on the leaves and the sudden collapse of the plant indicate the soil has been kept too wet. Let the plant tell you when to water—when it starts to droop, it needs a good drink. However, don’t wait until the leaves start to shrivel or you will lose some leaves. Dry, brown edges mean the plant was kept dry too long.

Humidity

This plant likes high humidity but it is very tolerant and can thrive even where there is low humidity.

Fertilizer

Pothos aren’t heavy feeders, but since there are no nutrients in most potting soils, feed monthly to bi-monthly with any balanced houseplant fertilizer.

Potting and Repotting

Eventually, your pothos will become pot bound. When the leaves droop, no matter how much or often you water them, the roots have probably filled the pot. Carefully lift the plant and check to see if this is the problem. When the plant has reached this stage, you can re-pot in a container one or two sizes larger, filled with fresh potting soil.

Pruning

Keep the stems trimmed relatively short to keep foliage full along the full stems. If stems grow bare, they can be cut back to the soil level, and new stems will sprout.

Propagating

This plant is easily propagated simply by taking stem cuttings and rooting them in water or in potting soil. Move cuttings rooted in water into the soil as soon as possible so they can begin getting nutrients.

Toxicity

Though rarely fatal, ingesting pothos can cause vomiting and irritation in pets and children.


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